Console gaming monitor

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Buying a monitor? Please refer to this post before purchasing.


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  • #50996
    billyknapp

    Hi everyone, it’s my first time here. Sorry for any mistakes, english is not my native language.

    I’m looking for a 24 inch, 1080p, 100-160 euro budget monitor for console gaming (PS4 Pro). A year ago I was playing Battlefield 1, so I thought I needed a TN monitor for competitive gaming, but someone strongly advised me NOT to buy the BenQ Zowie RL2455 and most of the TN panels because they have restrictive viewing angles, dull and uneven colors, and recommended me an IPS. Now that I’m playing Battlefield V and Red Dead Redemption 2, I need a compromise between performance (low response time and low input lag) and picture (vibrant colors, ’cause on my 40″ tv I can’t spot enemies).
    These were the recommended monitors: Acer R240Y, Acer RT240Y, Asus VZ249H, Dell U2417HA, iiyama XUB2492HSU-B1, Philips 245C5QHAB, Philips 246E7QDSW and Philips 257E7QDSB.
    I can’t find the Acer R240Y, the Philips 245C5QHAB and the Philips 257E7QDSB on amazon.it. The Dell U2417HA and the Asus VZ249H cost too much (there’s a VZ249HE on amazon.it, which comes 80€ less than the VZ249H, but I don’t know the differences).
    I’ve read some reviews and I’m torn between the iiyama XUB2492HSU-B1 (189€) and the Philips 246E7QDSW (160€). But I’m no expert, so feel free to suggest alternatives.

    Thank you.

    #49747
    Diabloslfc

    Hi,

    I am looking for a monitor which can be used to reach the potential of my gaming pc and ps4.

    PC specs:
    Gpu: 1080ti
    Cpu: i7 5930k

    Ps4 pro

    Desired requirements from monitor:
    – 4k
    – g sync
    – HDMI 2.0 ( to carry 4k from ps4)
    – 27inch minimum
    – decent response time (<20ms)
    – 16:9 aspect ratio,
    – 60hz
    – IPS (bonus)
    – HDR (bonus)
    – 10 bit colour (bonus)

    #49751
    PCM2

    @ billyknapp (pure console usage)

    As our article on console gaming monitors explores, I would agree that the IPS route would be better than the TN route. You’re limited to a 60Hz refresh rate in pretty much all cases as a console user, so the relatively strong pixel responses of a TN panel make a limited difference. Many IPS-type models are fast enough to give a decent 60Hz performance, with no obvious weaknesses – nothing that would stand out to most users. They’d generally find the richer and more consistent colours easier to notice.

    There are many ‘budget’ IPS-type models that would be acceptable to use for console gaming and you’ve listed quite a few. I haven’t tested many of these, I simply don’t have enough time or the resources to do so. But I do certainly recommend the Dell U2417H(A) for such uses as it’s a very accomplished all-round performer with some nice ports, a good design and good ergonomics (plus the “Dell factor” – good aftersales support). If you’re open to a glossy screen then you should consider the Dell S2419H as an alternative. It’s cheaper and provided you can control your lighting at least reasonably well (i.e. no light striking the screen directly, not too high ambient brightness) you’ll benefit from the excellent clarity and perceived vibrancy advantages of the glossy screen. It doesn’t have the same ergonomic adjustability or port arrangement, however.

    If you’re more inclined to go for a matte screen option and find the U2417H(A) too expensive, which I understand, then some of the models you’ve listed would probably be a suitable alternative. Many of the ~24″ IPS-type models are very similar and offer good all-round performance. The ASUS VZ249HE, for example, offers good core performance according to the admittedly quite limited user feedback I’ve received. Not the same ports, ergonomic flexibility or as accurate factory calibration as the Dell U2417H(A), but calibrated in a way that provides good rich colour output, decent accuracy and otherwise good all-round performance. Including decent pixel responsiveness and low input lag. The only difference between that and the VZ249H is the bezel colour (black on the ‘HE’, champagne on the ‘H’) and the fact the ‘H’ includes a 3.5mm audio jack and integrated speakers. As a console user I’m assuming a 3.5mm jack would be very helpful for you for audio output?

    @ Diabloslfc (PC and console usage)

    What is your budget and which of those features do you value the most? I’m afraid there is no monitor on the market that ticks all of those boxes. G-SYNC, for example, is only supported by either very expensive UHD monitors like the highly capable ASUS PG27UQ or the issue-ridden Acer XB321HK. I’m also not sure you’d find G-SYNC a particularly useful addition to a 60Hz 3840 x 2160 monitor. I own a GTX 1080 Ti as well and it’s really not difficult to maintain 60fps on most game titles, with a few sensible tweaks to graphics in some cases. In fact it can make a surprisingly decent go at higher frame rates – which, of course, only makes sense on those absurdly expensive 144Hz UHD models like the ASUS I mentioned.

    HDR capability is something that VESA has attempted to simplify with their DisplayHDR certification system. You can see the particulars here and highlighted in our relevant reviews of HDR-capable models. Basically, most are only DisplayHDR 400 certified (and some don’t even reach that level). That is not a true HDR experience and in my opinion it is a worse experience in most cases than simply running games in SDR. Unless you like universally high brightness. For a true HDR experience the monitor needs some sort of local dimming capability. That’s something which DisplayHDR 600 certification calls for (and indeed DisplayHDR 1000).

    With this in mind and assuming proper HDR would be a real bonus for you (and I think it could be, more so than G-SYNC) then consider the Philips 436M6VBPAB. If you’d prefer something smaller or you worry about some of the issues raised in the review, particularly if you’re needing to sit relatively close to the screen (or it’s beyond your budget etc.) then it might be worth waiting for the Philips 328P6VUBREB instead.

    #49752
    Diabloslfc

    Hi and thank you for comprehensive reply,

    You have helped me realise i can take g-sync off my required list. So my requirements are now:

    – 4k
    – HDMI 2.0 ( to carry 4k from ps4)
    – 27inch minimum – 34inch maximum
    – decent response time (<20ms)
    – 16:9 aspect ratio,
    – 60hz
    – IPS (bonus)
    – HDR (bonus)
    – 10 bit colour (bonus)

    My budget is below £700

    Is there a monitor out there for me 🙂

    #49753
    PCM2

    If you could wait until later in the year, the Philips 328P6VUBREB I mentioned would probably be worth waiting for. As noted in the article, it’s due in November (and we will be reviewing it at some point, hopefully not too long after release).

    Otherwise you’d only be looking at monitors with poor, if any, HDR capability. I still consider the BenQ PD3200U to be a good choice for PC and console gaming and it fits with your budget and most of your other requirements.

    #49754
    Diabloslfc

    That philips does look good, the issue i have is that ive just sold my only monitor so need one pretty quickly,

    What do you think of the following monitors?

    Dell UP2718Q

    LG 32UD99

    I will add BenQ PD3200U to my short list 🙂

    #49755
    PCM2

    The Dell UP2718Q has a poor HDR implementation – although it has local dimming, it’s a very sluggish solution. It is quite messy and doesn’t really give a convincing HDR experience. The responsiveness in general is quite poor as well.

    The LG 32UD99 has issues with obvious interlace pattern artifacts (shades appearing broken up into bands) and doesn’t support DisplayHDR 600. Partly because ‘only’ 550 cd/m² is supported, moreoever because the backlight lacks local dimming. It at least ticks the colour gamut box for decent HDR (95% DCI-P3), but that alone doesn’t create a good HDR experience. It’s also beyond the budget you stated of £700. It’s due to be replaced by the (more expensive and capable) LG 32UK950.

    #49756
    Diabloslfc

    Ok so those two are off the list 🙂

    What about:

    LG 27UK650-W

    LG 27UD69P-W

    Is the BenQ PD3200U still your no.1 recommendation ?

    #49757
    PCM2

    If you refer to the recommendations section, you’ll see that the LG 27UD68 is actually the recommended 27″ model at the moment. The 27UD69P is not available from Amazon (in the UK), generally costs more and does not offer anything over the 27UD68. In fact I had a user who replaced a 27UD68 with a UD69 thinking it was a newer and therefore superior model, only to end up returning it. He tested it exensively, noticed no difference whatsoever except for more backlight bleed. That’s not model-specific, it’s just inter-unit variation.

    As for the 27UK650, the HDR is the only addition over the UD68. Performance is otherwise similar, according to user feedback. But don’t buy it for the HDR, because it is one of those rubbish marketing-only implementations mentioned above. In fact it doesn’t offer a suitable colour gamut, let alone having any local dimming on the backlight. No reason to pay extra for that feature if implemented so poorly.

    #49774
    Diabloslfc

    I have been looking at the BenQ PD3200U, however some users complain of ghosting and there is not alot on how this monitor handles games. However i have seen some good gaming reviews for the BenQ EW3270U. Would you recommend this monitor?

    #49775
    PCM2

    Our review is the most detailed out there on the BenQ PD3200U and it focuses primarily on gaming. It has a very detailed responsiveness section which clearly highlights some strengths and weaknesses in the monitor. So have a read of that, because that will give you the best idea of what to expect from the monitor short of using it yourself. It is about as responsive as 60Hz monitors come in many respects. You’d be surprised how many users complain of “ghosting” on monitors like this and when you dig deeper they were either using ‘AMA = Premium’ (which gives terrible inverse ghosting) or they’re running their content at low frame rates due to how demanding the resolution is and are mistaking that for a monitor issue. Also, I’m not aware of any legitimate and trustworthy complaints about “ghosting” on this monitor. Don’t mistake feedback of the PD3200Q with this model.

    It has a small amount of overshoot using its optimal setting (‘AMA = High’) and some users are sensitive to that. But the responsiveness is in a different league to something like the EW3270U. That uses a significantly slower VA panel, similar to the one used in the AOC U3277PWQU. It has far more pronounced weaknesses than the PD3200U. I’d therefore suggest you don’t let hearsay from users put you off, buy it from somewhere with a good returns policy and you’ll probably enjoy it.

    #49798
    Diabloslfc

    Thanks for help, i noticed there is no reference to hdr in the review, well i couldn’t find one. Does it not have hdr 400 or 600?

    Im in three minds at the moment if i should to wait for the phillips you said in november with 600 hdr or go for a lg 27ud68 as its £300 at the moment on amazon or go for the benQ you recommended. I have never seen hdr before so i dont know how much of an impact it will have.

    #49801
    PCM2

    No, it does not support HDR. I do enjoy HDR myself, but only if it’s well implemented and at least VESA DisplayHDR 600. Which is why the Philips 328P6VUBREB could be interesting. Then again, there are many unknowns with that model and it could have some significant weaknesses compared to the BenQ PD3200U. Colour consistency and accuracy will certainly be worse and I suspect a grainier screen surface will be used. Responsiveness is something of an unknown, but it’s far more likely to be worse than on the BenQ vs. better.

    #49805
    Diabloslfc

    Thank you so much for help, BenQ it is 🙂

    #49809
    PCM2

    Good choice. I hope you enjoy it. When will you be making the purchase?

    #50658
    PCM2

    I see you’re on the hunt for a high refresh rate IPS model. Is this because you tried the BenQ PD3200U and decided you wanted to go a different route, or because you simply changed your mind before purchasing it?

    #50659
    Diabloslfc

    Hi, good memory, the benq unfortunately was too large for my set up and i misses the second screen, additionally i want to keep at least 60 fps on my games so would like to go 1440 as the sweet spot with a higher refresh rate for when on less demanding games. So looking for two of the same screen now and 27inch seems to be the ideal size for me. Could you recommend any screens with my new criteria please

    #50661
    PCM2

    I did, see the link in my previous post (“on the hunt”). I merged your thread with another. You should have received an email with my reply pointing you to the correct place, but sometimes the system messes up and that doesn’t happen. So it can be a bit confusing, sorry about that.

    #51010
    billyknapp

    Thanks for your detailed response.

    Now that I’m thinking about it, I’ll mostly play Battlefield V, with high FOV and sensitivity settings, so everything on screen will move super fast. Should I be worried about motion blur and ghosting, or anything below 8 ms is acceptable?

    Where is the average response time in this comparison chart? Which monitor has the lowest response time (DELL S2419H included)?
    https://i.imgur.com/UDLfFJR.png

    #51014
    PCM2

    Don’t obsess about specified and ‘average’ response times, instead have a good read of the comprehensive responsiveness section of the S2419H review or watch the relevant section of the video review for an idea of what to expect. As is clearly noted, the weaknesses are minor. And Battlefield 1 was specifically tested, in detail. This is more useful to users than those response time measurements, which are potentially misleading as they use very few measurement points. The testing we do encapsulates a very broad range of pixel transitions and accounts for the effect of refresh rate and the impact of pixel responsiveness on overall perceived blur.

    There are 255 grey levels and response time between those can change potentially significantly depending on the grey levels involved in the transition. Measuring response times for all or even a good chunk of those is impractical and then you need to consider whether the transition is performed ‘cleanly’ (with overshoot or not). And then of course you need to be mindful of the dramatic impact of refresh rate and how that impacts perceived blur and hence influences pixel response time requirements.

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